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Vintage road bike show gallery: Eddy Rando 2021

By Spencer Powlison

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If you love lugs, can't get enough Campagnolo, and swoon over steel, you've come to the right spot. We attended Sunday's Eddy Rando vintage road bike event in Parker, Colorado. It's a casual road ride for vintage steel bikes followed by a Concours d'Elegance show — the largest of its kind in our state (well, and also arguably the only).

We brought along one of TPC's photographers, Elizabeth Wilcox, to capture the beauty of these 134 show bikes. Here are the highlights. And remember, if you love vintage bikes, our online museum is full of rare rides and great stories.
Colnago Master
This late-'80s Colnago Master features Columbus Gilco, a distinctive shaped steel tubeset exclusive to Colnago frames.

Colnago Master detail
Exquisite lugs, paint finish, and that classic Campagnolo C-Record headset.

Motobecane Le ChampionNow over to France. This '75 Motobecane Le Champion has a beautiful lilac finish over its Reynolds 531 steel tubes.

Made in France
Back in this era, a French brand made its bikes in France, Italian in Italy, and so on. 

Battaglin Battaglin
This Officina Battaglin has retro looks but in fact it was made in 2017 to commemorate Stephen Roche's "triple crown." In 1987, he won the Tour de France, the Giro d'Italia, and the world championships. Seems worthy of inlaid diamonds.  

Bianchi CentenarioBianchi went all-out for its 100th anniversary. This 1985 Centenario has Bianchi touches on practically every component.

Campagnolo C-Record derailleur
The entire Campagnolo C-Record group has special Bianchi pantograph (engraving) throughout. Also of note, the front hub is a rare "sheriff star" flange design.

Centenario head tube Bianchi bottle
The Bianchi Centenario's black chrome color scheme was especially striking in contrast with the iconic celeste green.

Campagnolo Deltaa Campagnolo Delta rear

Another gorgeous example of a Colnago Master, and this one gets high marks for the pantograph Campagnolo Delta brakes.

Tommasini bike
Italian brand Tommasini was known for this level of detail in its stunning paint finishes.

Campagnolo front hubLittle details tell you a lot. This Campagnolo quick release is pre-1978. Why? Because after that year, the U.S. Consumer Product and Safety Commission (CPSC) required curved levers so you could tell when a QR was closed.

Bianchi 1945
This 1949 Bianchi Folgara is older than most bikes in the show but quite elegant. Without derailleur technology at their disposal, Campagnolo engineers devised the Cambio Corsa gear changer system, that's the two quick releases on the seat stay. Although primitive, Gino Bartali rode to victory in the '48 Tour de France using this system.
Bianchi headset
Far ahead of its time, Bianchi built this frame with an integrated headset.

Cambio Corsa Campagnolo Nuovo Record rear derailleur Campagnolo C-Record

A peek at the development of the Campagnolo derailleur, starting with the Cambio Corsa (left), on to Nuovo record from the '70s Motobecane shown earlier (center), and a first-generation C-Record derailleur found on one of the '80s Colnago Masters.

Gianni Motta bike
You might think 7-Eleven was the first American team to race a Grand Tour, but in fact, in 1984, the Gianni Motta-Linea MD team was the first, racing the Giro d'Italia that year. In addition to providing striking stars-and-stripes bikes like this one, Motta paved the way for his American team to race in Europe.

Windsor bike
Windsor was started by a few ex-Cinelli employees who decamped to Mexico. They used the same lugwork and many of the design features of their former employer, earning Windsor the dubious moniker as a "fake Cinelli."

Cinelli bike
Now this is a proper Cinelli, owned by TPC's TradeUP coordinator Sean "Sully" Sullivan. The frame is an '85, while the Campagnolo C-Record 50th anniversary group is from '83.

Campagnolo 50th anniversary C-Record
The finish of Campagnolo's 50th anniversary C-Record group is stunning with gold inlays and an inscription of Tulio Campagnolo's signature, the company's founder and famously the inventor of the quick-release axle.

Hetchins bike head tube Hetchins bike
The lugs on this frame from Hetchins of England are nonpareil. 

 


10 comments


  • My 1953 Rotrax is as it should be, but no mention why? you seem bias to Italian bikes buy you show Hetchins?

    john crump on

  • I would love to have an event like that closer to the East coast. Come on ya’ll and put on an event this side of the Mississippi. Love it!!

    Wynn Young on

  • What a splendid show! In case anyone should happen to be in Basel (Switzerland) March 2022, there is a similar concours d’elegance event planned:

    https://www.concoursvelo.ch/

    Flash on

  • Thanks to Steve for arranging this fabulous collection of photographs and to Elizabeth, bike photographer extraordinaire. It was a great show. Watch for the 7th annual Concours d’Elegance Eddy Rando in 2022.

    Richard Hansen on

  • What, no Olmos?? I still have and love my ‘85 Professionisti that I built in Davis while attending and pretending to race on the Cal Aggie Cycling Team.

    Michael Randazzo on

  • I think the photographer got there a little early, because there were some other bikes missing from some of these photos that were there earlier, including a brand new, exact replica of Eddie Merckx’s 1968 Giro winning Peugeot.

    Bradford Towne on

  • Equally as stunning as that green/silver master was the red one right next to it!

    What, no love for the gorgeous modern steel that was there?!?!

    phil heyer on

  • This was probably the best collection of vintage bikes I’ve seen, rivaling even the concours d’elegance at Eroica California

    MM on

  • That Colnago Master is gorgeous! Always loved the look of Delta brakes but heard they aren’t great stoppers. I’d still ride it. Wish I could’ve been there!

    Bruce Lin on

  • I’ll take a 2 wheel concours over a 4 wheel any day.

    Matthew on


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